Bauhaus, Anni Albers & Margot Selby

Brief introduction to Bauhaus

Celebrating 100th anniversary of Bauhaus…

Established in 1919 in Germany, by architect Walter Gropius, the experimental design school, became famous for one of design’s most radical and influential concepts – its approach to unify art, craft and technology. In 1933 the school was forced to close, following pressure from the Nazis, however in 1937 the new Bauhaus was founded in Chicago.

The Bauhaus style later became one of the most distinguished movements in modern design. It transformed art, architecture, interior design, industrial design, graphic design and typography. There were many Bauhaus artists such as; Walter Gropius, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Marcel Breuer, Josef Albers, Oksar Schlemmer, Anni Albers, Marianne Brand…  


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Anni Albers

I admire the work of Anni Albers, a German artist and textile designer. She was best known for combining traditional and ancient weaving techniques, with modern materials and design. One of the most prestigious textile artists of the 20th century, working with striking geometric patterns, her works are well known for the revolutionary use of colour. She learned about colour from Paul Klee; adapted his colourful combination of blending and mixing watercolours to fabricate new tones to textiles, combining and clashing blocks of colour in surprising ways. She was famous for developing a sound-proof fabric and creating loose weaves, allowing air to circulate and to filter light through large, modernist windows.  

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A few months ago the Tate Modern displayed a fabulous exhibition of her work. I was instantly taken by the colour, texture and pattern of her designs. Her work is a lesson in colour geometry, tactile and visual, but above all, it gives pleasure and delight to the eye, the mind and the sense of touch. In the 1950s she was invited by the architect and furniture designer, Florence Knoll, to collaborate with the Knoll Textile Department, to create and produce new fabrics. She developed the Eclat design with Knoll, a geometric pattern, which is still in production today.

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Margot Selby

“Margot Selby continues Alber’s pictorial weaving tradition in her rugs, throws, cushions and artwork. ” Her love of geometrics and colour combinations are a celebration to Alber’s legacy. Her collections range from textiles for interiors, to decorative art, fashion and stationery. She explores colour, composition and mark making, through her exquisite, bold, abstract patterns and contemporary designs.

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She was commissioned by Osborne & Little to create an exclusive collection of furnishing fabrics; she developed new fabrics designs for Casa Botelho, taking inspiration from Brazilian culture and tiles of Oscar Niemeyer; and she collaborated with Decca, creating a new fabric for the ‘Assembly’ Sofa.

If you are looking for a unique statement piece for your living space or bedroom, with textural design of zig zags, undulating lines, woven geometric patterns and vibrant colours, then look no further…

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Style inspiration through my eyes…

The Visual Aficionado – Sol Aires Designs

  • Some pictures sourced from Instagram, Pinterest, Google, Margot Selby.

2 thoughts on “Bauhaus, Anni Albers & Margot Selby

  1. You write so well Solange! I love Paul Klee but didn’t know he was part of Bauhaus.
    I first came across Bauhaus when we had a case study on it as part of my business admin degree ( many moons ago)

    1. Thank you Lorna and I am glad you enjoyed my blog. I admire Anni Albers and I love Margot Selby’s textiles. I ordered some samples for my future projects, cushions, and footstool for my lounge. Work in progress…

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